Jonathan E. Etter

Title: Author
Location: Dayton, Ohio, United States

Jonathan Etter, Author, has been recognized by Marquis Who’s Who Top Artists for dedication, achievements, and leadership in chronicling television history.

Mr. Etter has found much success as a television historian. His books have recounted the histories and the stars behind many of the popular television productions of the 1960s and 1970s. In 2003, in what he considers a career highlight, he published “Quinn Martin, Producer,” a behind-the-scenes history of the QM Productions television company, with a biography of its founder Quinn Martin, the man behind such shows as produced a string of successful television series during the 1960s and 1970s, including “The Fugitive,” “Twelve O’Clock High,” “The F.B.I.,” “The Invaders,” “The Streets of San Francisco,” “Cannon” and “Barnaby Jones.” 

In 2010, Mr. Etter wrote “Gangway, Lord! Here Come the Brides,” a behind-the-scenes history of the 1968-1970 ABC-TV series, including chapters on the series regulars, semi-regulars and off-camera personnel, accompanied by a very detailed episode guide. He found further success in 2016 with “There’s an Old Polish Proverb that Says, ‘BANACEK’: A Behind-the-Scenes History and Episode Guide to the 1972-1974 NBC Mystery Movie Series” chronicling the detective show starring George Peppard as Thomas Banacek, a detective solving seemingly impossible thefts.

Mr. Etter began his career as a television historian when a high school friend remarked that since he was always talking about his favorite television shows, he should start writing about them. At first, he was not confident about interviewing the stars and other personnel behind the shows, but it became easier once he got started. He currently has three book projects currently in development, with titles such as “21 Years of Quality: A Behind-the-Scenes Episode Guide to the Television Series of Quinn Martin,” “Movie and TV-Movie Tales: Behind the Scenes of Fifty Fabulous Features from the 1930s, ’40s, ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s,” and “One-Season Wonders: A Behind-the-Scenes Episode Guide and Series History to Some Much Too-Short-Lived Shows from the 1960s and ’70s.”

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